Directing Shakespeare Out Loud
With far less archaic language and no iambic pentameter verse to contend with these scripts make it much easier to invent Shakespeare's words like heightened everyday speech. Most of directing is just making sure everyone understands what they are saying and hearing, and why they are speaking - just like doing any play. Since his language is so rich however, and his world-view so comprehensive, I suggest additional language to encourage actors.

Shakespeare directing.

Shakespeare directing.

Color your language with thought. That actually means knowing why your character says exactly what they do - and what exactly do those words mean. That knowledge is the paint for your mental pictures. The clearer the pictures in the mind, the clearer the audience hears them.

Fresh-mint or invent your language. We do this in everyday speech all the time. What is going to happen next, or what is going to be said next, is the very essence of drama. The predictability of rhythm destroys this. Fresh-mint your text instead, with lots of different speeds.

 Antithesis, wonder, high notes, and speed. Shakespeare was addicted to antithesis; it was what made him so funny and so profound. "To be or not to bes" are everywhere in Shakespeare. Often the thoughts of Shakespeare's characters are so accurate and so surprising, the actor/character can't help but experience the emotion of wonder. The only way to vocally express this wonder often involves using the high notes in the voice. Sometimes the only way to fully experience the passion and richness of these thoughts is with great speed. So, predictable, Shakespearean chanting in a monotone just won't work; colorful, invented, antithetical thought, played with music, speed and wonder, will. These are also important tools of leadership, that need to be practiced.